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Date: 2024-07-24 Page is: DBtxt001.php txt00022127
SHIPS
SHIPBUILDING

Free Documentary Video ... Building the World's Biggest Ships | Heavy Lift: Jumboisation at shipyard in Italy


Original article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vQPWEKcDGM
Burgess COMMENTARY
This video is from around 2014. At the time the cruise industry was expanding rapidly and the ships in use were getting bigger and bigger.
This video is about the engineering issues associated with increasing the size of an already large ship. The various pieces of specialized machinery used for this type of super large project are interesting and highlight the quality and competence of Italian engineering.
Peter Burgess
Building the World's Biggest Ships | Heavy Lift: Jumboisation | Free Documentary

78,136 views

Apr 15, 2022

Free Documentary

3.57M subscribers

Heavy Lift - Jumboisation | Engineering Documentary

Heavy Lift - Giant 7-Billion-Euro Flood Barrier in Venice: https://youtu.be/cVNfTgsp44k

#FreeDocumentary #Documentary #HeavyLift #FreeDocumentary #Documentary #HeavyLift

How does a huge stadium roof, a surge barrier or a out of service cruise liner get from one place to another? This series tells the story of how huge objects move and this episode is about the process of stretching a ship: called jumboisation. If Archimedes said “Give me a lever and I will move the world”, today the answer is usually wheels and hydraulics. Lifting and moving massive machinery or structures is the speciality of a handful of companies and the equipment they use is often tailor made for the job, be they cranes, trailers, flatbeds, barges, and even ship carriers.

Today the cruise industry is demanding bigger and bigger ships, since more passengers means more dollars. Instead of building expensive new ships, many companies are choosing to simply cut their old ships in half and stretch them to make them bigger. The process is called “jumboisation” and the world’s heavy lift companies are busy learning the best way to make ships bigger. It is a complex big engineering task. The cruise liners of today are two football pitches long and can weigh up to 50 thousand tonnes. Of course in the sea, weight is no issue, but what about when they have to be hauled into dry dock and cut in half? That’s where the world’s heavy lift companies come in. The program follows Heavy Lift company Fagioli of Italy, as they stretch a ship belonging to the MSC line along with leading cruise ship builder, Fincantieri in the Mediterranean port of Palermo.
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The text being discussed is available at
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vQPWEKcDGM
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