image missing
HOME SN-BRIEFS SYSTEM
OVERVIEW
EFFECTIVE
MANAGEMENT
PROGRESS
PERFORMANCE
PROBLEMS
POSSIBILITIES
STATE
CAPITALS
FLOW
ACTIVITIES
FLOW
ACTORS
PETER
BURGESS
SiteNav SitNav (0) SitNav (1) SitNav (2) SitNav (3) SitNav (4) SitNav (5) SitNav (6) SitNav (7) SitNav (8)
Date: 2022-07-01 Page is: DBtxt001.php txt00021070

Management Mewtrics
Managing for SDG performance

UNDP and Duke University of launch an Impact Measurement and Management course


-->
Original article:
Burgess COMMENTARY

Peter Burgess
UNDP and Duke University launch an Impact Measurement and Management course

The Impact Measurement and Management for the SDGs course emphasizes ways to improving decision-making for an impact on the SDGs, which we have translated into 4 universal practices of impact measurement and management through changes enterprises and investors can make in strategy, management approach, transparency, and governance. The free online course is developed in line with the UNDP SDG Impact Standards.

How can the private sector help fill the $2 trillion gap needed for sustainable development? By getting better at measuring and managing its impact on people and planet.

This module introduces the 4 universal steps of impact measurement and management (SET STRATEGY, INTEGRATE, OPTIMIZE and REINFORCE), explores how they can be applied across the investment value chain to simplify ESG and impact practices.

It also introduces the SDG Impact Standards and the 5 Dimensions of Impact.

Instructor's Note

Cathy Clark

Welcome to Impact Measurement & Management for the SDGs! You’re joining thousands of learners currently enrolled in the course. I'm excited to have you in the class and look forward to your contributions to the learning community.

To begin, I recommend taking a few minutes to explore the course site. Review the material we’ll cover each week, and preview the assignments you’ll need to complete to pass the course. Click Discussions to see forums where you can discuss the course material with fellow students taking the class.

If you have questions about course content, please post them in the forums to get help from others in the course community. For technical problems with the Coursera platform, visit the Learner Help Center.

Good luck as you get started, and I hope you enjoy the course! Week 1

Estimated Time: 1h 2m

Welcome to IMM for SDGs

Volume 1:01 / 6:42 Subtitles Settings Full Screen

Transcript English

Interactive Transcript - Enable basic transcript mode by pressing the escape key

You may navigate through the transcript using tab. To save a note for a section of text press CTRL + S. To expand your selection you may use CTRL + arrow key. You may contract your selection using shift + CTRL + arrow key. For screen readers that are incompatible with using arrow keys for shortcuts, you can replace them with the H J K L keys. Some screen readers may require using CTRL in conjunction with the alt key

Play video starting at ::8 and follow transcript0:08

[MUSIC]

Welcome to the impact measurement and management for SDGs course.

My name is Cathy Clark, and I teach impact finance and entrepreneurship at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business.

I've worked as a professional investor in philanthropy and on policy. Through this journey, I've been interested in how business and finance can be used to make the world a better place.

I, along with a team at CASE, I'm thrilled to bring this course to you.

We designed this training because every business and every investor has impact on people's lives in the planet, both positive and negative, intended and unintended impacts. That's a fact. It's also true that most businesses and investors don't yet know what those impacts are.

Play video starting at :1:17 and follow transcript1:17

A key way to contribute to sustainable development is to know what kind of impact you want to have, how to measure the impact you actually have, and how to manage for improvement over time.

Play video starting at :1:35 and follow transcript1:35

That brings us to the purpose of this course. To teach you how to apply impact measurement and management for the SDGs.

Let's take a moment to define some of these terms.

The SDGs are a set of 17 global goals intended to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all.

The SDGS were designed by the United Nations and over 190 countries have signed up to work towards achieving them by 2030.

You could say they're global to do list for achieving sustainable development.

They've been an effective call to action for many in the private sector, including corporations, pension funds, investment funds, and small enterprises.

It's currently estimated that achieving the SDGs will require an additional $2.5 trillion dollars of funding annually.

Play video starting at :2:38 and follow transcript2:38

Knowing whether or not we're on track to achieving the SDGs requires robust practices around impact measurement and management or IMM.

These are the practices that help your organization make informed decisions about how to improve the well being of people and planet that you influence. This training specifically focuses on the IMM practices you want to undertake to optimize your impact on the Sustainable Development Goals or SDGs.

Although you could use these same concepts to align with any impact goal you might have.

We're excited to partner with the United Nations Development Program or UNDP to present this course.

Play video starting at :3:30 and follow transcript3:30

SDG impact, which is an initiative under the UNDP, has created new practice and governance standards for private sector impact on the SDGs.

This course will show you how to align your practices with these standards and other major impact standards.

Play video starting at :3:51 and follow transcript3:51

You might be here today because you want to align with standards like those created by the UN. Or you might simply want to know the impact your organization is having on its key stakeholders.

You might be interested or engaged in impact investing or sustainable finance.

You might be managing a small business or a major multinational corporation and wanting to better track and improve your impact on people and the planet.

Regardless of where you sit or your background, this course is for you if you're interested in using business and finance to contribute to sustainable equitable development.

Play video starting at :4:35 and follow transcript4:35

So what may get in the way of you doing that?

Well, the plethora of measurement standards and reporting frameworks can make this a daunting task.

It may seem overwhelming to try to figure out how to measure and manage your impact, or to figure out exactly what to integrate into your practices and how to choose the tool that is right for you, to figure out where to start or what to do next.

Don't worry, this course is designed to help you get past those barriers.

We've distilled decades of thinking and research on this topic into four universal steps you can take to improve your impact management practices, no matter where you're starting off.

Whether you're just dipping a toe in the water and need to start with step one, or you've already waded out into the impact measurement and management pool and are looking for some ways to improve your swim stroke.

Play video starting at :5:35 and follow transcript5:35

As you'll see, this training is for both enterprise and investor audiences.

Enterprises and investors have different roles to play when it comes to managing sustainable development, but they play best together when they are aligned and appreciative of each other's goals and constraints.

Play video starting at :5:55 and follow transcript5:55

The course will equip you with the knowledge and skills to understand and apply the universal four step process to measuring and managing impact, align your work with the UN SDG impact standards, share your progress in ways that others trust, and be recognized and rewarded for the impact you contribute.

Play video starting at :6:24 and follow transcript6:24

Ready? Let's get started by introducing you to the four universal steps of impact measurement and management.
-----------------------------------------------
[MUSIC]

Play video starting at ::16 and follow transcript0:16

Every business and financial institution has impact on people's well being. And yet, most of those impacts are not measured or managed. How likely are you to have the impact you envision, if you aren't measuring and managing it?

Let's imagine two companies, both are maternity clinic chains serving Sub- Saharan Africa.

Company A aims to help patients have healthy births, which is related to SDG 3.2.

So they've added the SDG 3 tile their website and annual report. They report to their board each year on metrics like numbers of patients served and the profitability of each clinic.

When the board chair asks, how their infant and maternal health outcomes compared to other clinics in the region, they admit they don't have that information.

But they do know their infant and maternal death rates across their clinic network have gone down over the last five years.

Company B, is also primarily working towards SDG 3.2.

They have established annual processes to engage with their key stakeholders, including their patients, staff, and local community members to gather input and feedback on their work.

This engagement led them to set some concrete annual targets related to lowering infant and maternal infection and mortality rates, as well as increasing staff satisfaction and pay.

They have systems to regularly collect data related to these targets. And they analyze this data across their clinics so that they can take specific actions, such as reallocating funds or staff based on progress toward their targets.

For example, last year they tested a mobile message program in three underperforming clinics to remind patients about care guidance. They saw an improvement in health outcomes and now plan to roll out this program across all of their clinics.

The staff who created the program were recognized at the annual company retreat where they shared their experience so others could learn.

Now, let's say you're a manager of impact Fund C. You've promised your investors that you will invest their capital to contribute to SDG 3. Which of these two companies would you invest in?

Play video starting at :3:8 and follow transcript3:08

I'm guessing you would pick Company B, what's different about Company B? They haven't simply declared that because they work in maternal health, they're contributing to SDG 3.2.

Instead, they've asked their stakeholders which impacts are the most important to them.

They've set specific goals.

They've developed systems to get information on performance to those goals.

And they've used performance data to make decisions about the new actions they'll take to try to improve impact.

There's evidence that they have aligned their team around common goals and have also recognized the team when the goals are met.

Simply put, they have better PRACTICES in place for measuring and managing their impact.

But this is also a false choice in some ways. Company A and B are both on a journey.

Company B is simply farther along on that journey.

Company A is earlier but is doing some things well, such as comparing performance longitudinally.

As a portfolio manager, you might believe you have a lot to offer Company A.

You might invest, you might take a board seat, you might help Company A set up a more robust impact management practice so they can improve their impact as well as their financial performance.

As a manager of impact Funds C, you also need to think about where you are on your impact management journey.

How well are you setting goals and targets? How do you engage with your most important stakeholders around impact outcomes?

What processes do you have in place to use data to make better decisions over time?

How do you share the outcomes of your work in a way that builds confidence in the impact that you're having?

This course is designed to give Company A, Company B, investors C, and any enterprise manager or investor the concrete steps they can take to improve SDG impact management practice.

We've distilled decades of research frameworks and guidance down to what we call the 4 universal steps to creating a robust impact measurement and management practice.
  • Set strategy,
  • integrate,
  • optimize and
  • reinforce.


Within each step, we tell you the practices that enterprises and investors can undertake.

And we highly recommend that you learn the processes from both perspectives. Because successful impact management requires that enterprises and investors be in alignment.

Enterprises do most of the work on the ground, creating and sustaining impact.

And investors have tremendous power to select and support that on the ground work.

Their systems and their stakeholders might be different, but they need to talk to each other.

In each module, start with the enterprise lesson to understand the goals, constraints, and operational guidance for enterprises.

Then, view the investor lesson to understand the unique characteristics of working higher on the capital chain for sustainable development.

Set strategy equips you to understand the material issues most relevant to your stakeholders.

And then define your target SDG outcomes in ways that align with your overall business or investment objectives. You'll create an impact thesis for each. And if you're an investor, a revised investment policy statement that integrates your SDG goals.

You'll also set ABC classification levels for your goals. Integrate teaches you how to put into place the resources, tools and processes that will allow you to measure your SDG impact.

If you're an enterprise, this includes setting performance targets, choosing indicators from across the 5 dimensions, and deciding how you'll track those indicators.

If you're an investor, this involves integrating impact management processes into every step of your investment process from due diligence all the way through exit.

Play video starting at :7:38 and follow transcript7:38

Optimize, is about what you do with the processes you've set up to generate information about your impact.

Importantly, this step goes beyond just collecting the data. This is where you use the data to create more impact.

We show you how to analyze enterprise data to understand where performance deviated from the plan and why.

Then, we guide you to use that analysis to make decisions about the new actions you'll take to improve impact performance.

If you're an investor, you'll review the data coming from your investees and monitor their management of SDG impact. You'll decide whether to hold and engage to increase impact, or exit taking impact considerations into account.

Finally, in reinforce, you'll deepen your governance and accountability for the impact you're creating. This includes disclosing to internal stakeholders and the public your impact measurement and management performance.

You'll also learn about 3rd party verifications, how to get ready to undertake them, and how to use them to improve your work.

Of course, you never really reach the end of these 4 steps. The journey is a cycle. You'll want to continually strengthen your practices under each of these steps, creating a more robust IMM system that helps you generate improved impact over time.

We believe the most positive and sustained impact on sustainable development only happens when we actively manage it.

Are you ready to move forward in your own journey of measuring and managing your impact?

Let's begin.

Play video starting at :9:33 and follow transcript9:33

[MUSIC]

4 Personas: Where Do You Fit in the Capital Chain for Sustainable Development?

Play Video Play Volume 0:00 / 7:30 Settings Full Screen Transcript

Interactive Transcript - Enable basic transcript mode by pressing the escape key

You may navigate through the transcript using tab. To save a note for a section of text press CTRL + S. To expand your selection you may use CTRL + arrow key. You may contract your selection using shift + CTRL + arrow key. For screen readers that are incompatible with using arrow keys for shortcuts, you can replace them with the H J K L keys. Some screen readers may require using CTRL in conjunction with the alt key

Play video starting at ::14 and follow transcript0:14

Recent estimates state the world needs from $5-7 trillion of investment every year to achieve the global sustainable development goals or SDGs by 2030. Private sector investment is critical to meet this need. In this video, we'll introduce four private sector personas, the challenges they're facing, and see how they fit into an overall capital chain for private sector-led sustainable development. This is Grace. She is CEO of a small chain of maternity clinics for low to middle-income patients in South Africa. Her business strategy includes contributing positively to the SDGs related to maternal and infant health. Grace wants her clinic to be known both for meeting the needs of her patients and improving health outcomes in her community.

Grace is aware that her clinics also generate some negative impacts, such as impacts on the environment. She wants to manage both her positive and negative impacts in ways that respect the priorities of her stakeholders, including patients, employees, and investors.

As a small business CEO, how can Grace align her work with the best practices of impact management for SDGs?

This is Miguel.

Miguel runs a division based in Brazil of a multinational company. His division sells technology products to increase crop yields to indigenous farmers across Latin America.

Miguel can see there's real potential to expand, and he believes that expansion could both increase profits and have significant impact on economic development and the environment.

He wants to develop a plan that builds confidence and credibility that his division is contributing positively to sustainable development and the SDGs. But he's not sure where to start.

As a leader inside a multinational enterprise, how can Miguel develop a strategy for his division that's based on best practices in impact management?

This is Akhil.

Akhil is a managing partner at a private equity firm based in India. His firm is launching a new fund, investing in medium-sized enterprises in Southeast Asia, working in the climate change, financial inclusion, education, and health sectors.

He and his partners want to design this fund with a core mission of positive contribution to the SDGs while maintaining the confidence of the investors that they are optimizing for both financial and impact performance.

As an asset manager, how can Akhil, design an impact management system that supports decision-making aligned with the firm sustainable development objectives, and that helps him communicate effectively with potential investors about their approach?

This is Paula.

Paula is an executive at a pension fund in Canada with a history of incorporating ESG or environmental, social, and governance considerations into investments. Recently, the fund's management has explored allocating $20 billion of assets more closely with the SDGs in themes including climate protection and equity and inclusion.

Paula needs to define an investment policy for the new impact portfolio and set up an investment selection, management, and reporting process that helps her manage the portfolio to the new strategy.

As an asset owner, how can Paula define an investment policy and build a selection and management process for SDG enabling investments?

Enterprise managers like Grace and Miguel, and investors like Akhil or Paula, are part of what we call the capital chain for sustainable development. They each have a role in contributing to sustainable development, and their efforts are interdependent.

Enterprises like Grace's and Miguel's are managing positive and negative impacts on customers, beneficiaries, and other stakeholders on the ground.

Investors like Akhil and Paula, support enterprises with capital and expertise to accelerate their work while managing their own set of stakeholders.

Investors depend on information from their investees to determine if they are indeed generating the results they promise to their investors. At its simplest, investment capital flows down this chain, and information about positive and negative impact flows up the chain.

How information flows up and down this capital chain is a major consideration in managing for improved impact on sustainable development.

You might be an enterprise manager like Grace or Miguel, or an investor like Akhil or Paula, or you might be an intermediary advisor or consultant to a member of this capital chain.

Regardless of where you sit along the chain, if you want to credibly show how you are contributing to sustainable development and the achievement of the SDGs, you need to articulate your goals and take specific actions to achieve them. This is what we call impact management for sustainable development.

This training teaches you the specific decisions you can make and the actions you can take to develop a sustainable development impact management practice.

Throughout this training, we'll show you real-world examples of how our enterprise managers, Grace and Miguel, and our investors, Akhil and Paula would approach this process.

Whether you're the CEO of an impact enterprise, a corporate manager building out of business line, a fund manager investing for impact, or an asset owner, determining how to allocate your portfolio, or someone else wanting to learn more about how to manage impact, this course will help you learn about the best practices in impact management.
----------------------------------
The 5 Dimensions of Impact

Play Video Play Volume 0:00 / 7:50 Settings Full Screen

Transcript

English Interactive Transcript - Enable basic transcript mode by pressing the escape key

You may navigate through the transcript using tab. To save a note for a section of text press CTRL + S. To expand your selection you may use CTRL + arrow key. You may contract your selection using shift + CTRL + arrow key. For screen readers that are incompatible with using arrow keys for shortcuts, you can replace them with the H J K L keys. Some screen readers may require using CTRL in conjunction with the alt key

Play video starting at ::16 and follow transcript0:16

Every time an investor puts a dollar into an investment, it will fund activities that have both positive and negative impacts on people and the planet.

As an investor, your dollar might help create jobs. It also might fund automation that displaces jobs. But outside of your financial return, you might not know what impact your investment is having. Is your dollar helping people you care about? Or is it making their lives worse? How will you know?

Investors looking to invest for social or environmental impact usually want to know something more about the dollars they invest, something about what their dollars did while they were out in the world.

Some may even want to show how the positive impacts of their dollars aligned with global standards like the UN sustainable development goals, also known as SDGs.

How do you know your investments are having the impact you intended? You can't know you're having impact if you haven't defined what you care about.

The five dimensions of impact are building blocks to help you define your goals, and then later they help you measure and manage your impact more easily.

This video is about understanding the five dimensions of impact measurement and management.

The five dimensions of impact are what, who, how much, contribution and risk.

The first dimension is, what. What are the outcomes of your investment? Our icon for what, is a square. Picture the 17 sustainable development goals, each with its own square icon.

Most of the SDGs are what outcomes? Goals for the social and environmental impacts in the world, such as zero hunger, affordable and clean energy, or quality education.

Let's assume your what is related to SDG number 5, gender equality.

The key questions to ask for the what dimension are, what specific outcome do we expect? Are we targeting a positive or negative change in that outcome?

It's actually the change in outcome that we call impact.

Then how important is that outcome to the people experiencing it or to the entire planet?

The second dimension is, who. Who is symbolized by a circle, and speaks to who experiences the outcome.

Either a certain group of people or the entire planet. For who you define the key characteristics of the group you're trying to impact.

These could be age, location, gender, income level, industry, or some other quality or condition.

For example, maybe the who you're trying to impact his female business owners in the United States, or women in India without access to financial services.

Or rural women having babies in Uganda.

Who can also be the planet when we're talking about outcomes related to the environment.

Another key question to ask about who is how underserved is this population?

For example, you can see by looking at infant mortality rates that pregnant women in Japan are relatively well-served by local health care with fewer than two deaths per 1,000 births.

Whereas pregnant women in Uganda appear relatively underserved with 19 deaths per 1,000 births.

Sustainable Development Goal 3.2, is to lower global child mortality to less than 2.5 percent in all countries by 2030.

Investing in an enterprise working to help lower infant mortality rates in Uganda from 19-2.5 percent could be a way to achieve that SGD. You see who can get very specific.

The third dimension is how much.

This dimension seeks to determine how much of the what outcome is actually occurring.

Think of this as a measuring stick where we want to show that a measurable change happens due to our investment.

I want to know when I invest in a maternity clinic, how many pregnant women have healthy babies there.

In addition to how many, which is often a question of reach or scale, you might also want to ask questions about duration or depth of impact.

For duration, you might ask, how long did improvements in health outcomes last for the babies born in the clinic we invested in?

That same SDG that we talked about, asks that they survive for the first five years of life.

For depth, you might ask to what degree did infant infection rates change?

The fourth dimension of performance is contribution.

There is contribution at the enterprise level, what the enterprise does to change an outcome and at the investor level.

For now, we're focusing on the investor's contribution.

This dimension asks us to consider what we add with our investments, especially relative to what might have happened without us.

For example, some investments don't happen but for your additional cash.

Many early-stage private investments are like this. Others would happen no matter what, such as most public equity or stock investments.

If you own the stock of a company, that treats its women employees poorly, you can sell it to someone else and it will likely make very little difference to those women.

Contribution can be very complex. We're going to keep it simple and just ask, what are the changes that the investor can reasonably take credit for?

Not all investments will be high contribution investments, and that's okay.

The fifth dimension is risks.

For risks, you want to ask, what are the ways your outcomes could turn out differently or worse than you expect?

There are many different kinds of risks. Investors often think about financial risk.

They ask, what are the risks that my money will not generate the returns I targeted? Then they work hard to reduce those risks.

Investors with social or environmental goals also need to consider impact risks. These are the risks that my investment will not have the impact that I targeted. Some risks might be out of my control, like a recession or a pandemic.

Some risks may stem from not actually reaching my target population, or to the way I'm collecting information.

For example, if I plan to improve health outcomes for low-income women through the clinic I invested in, but that clinic has never tracked the gender or income level of patients.

That lack of data could be an impact risk. Now, you know the five dimensions, the building blocks for understanding impact.

When you are setting goals for an investment, you know the five things to consider.

What you are trying to do?

Who you are trying to reach? How much of the intended impact you're hoping will occur?

What evidence of contribution there could be? What are the risks that impact may not happen as you intended? Practice Quiz • 10 min Week 1 Practice Quiz Total points 10 1. Question 1 What are the SDGs? 2 points
  • A global “to-do list” for achieving sustainable development.
  • Disclosure and reporting standards for sustainability
  • Goals for development created by the US government.
2. Question 2 What is impact measurement and management? 2 points
  • A set of practices that help your organization make better and more informed decisions about how to measure performance and continually improve the well-being of people and planet you influence.
  • A set of metrics that tell you how much impact you have had on your financial stakeholders.
  • The practice of pulling data on SDGs into a report you can share with stakeholders
3. Question 3 Which of these statements is the best definition of sustainable development as envisioned by the UN SDGs? 1 point
  • Sustainable development is development that aims to maximize financial value to improve the financial well-being for as many people as possible, globally.
  • Sustainable development is development that aims to create a more sustainable, equitable, and peaceful world, where the present population’s needs can be met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.
4. Question 4 Why is the private sector important for achieving the SDGs? 1 point Because EVERY business and EVERY investor has impact on people’s lives and the planet – both positive and negative, intended and unintended impacts. Because the public sector thinks that the private sector should be primarily responsible for fixing the planet’s problems 5. Question 5 Which of the following statements is NOT a valid reason why businesses should want to manage their impact on SDGs? 1 point To make better and more informed decisions about how to improve the well-being of people and planet they influence. To show they are being good corporate citizens with the assets and influence they wield on communities To sell fewer products To get a better cost of capital 6. Question 6 Who wrote and produced this course? 1 point The team at CASE at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, led by Faculty Director Cathy Clark, with help from SDG Impact, the Impact Management Project, and many global advisors. The SDG Impact team at the UNDP 7. Question 7 What are the 4 universal practices of impact measurement and management around which this course is organized? 1 point Set Strategy, Collect Data, Disclose, Get Certified Environment, Social, and Governance, and Impact Set Strategy, Integrate, Optimize, Reinforce 8. Question 8 When you view this course, you should: 1 point Only do the lessons that apply to your role, enterprise or investor. No matter what your role, for each week or step, start with the enterprise lessons and then, complete the investor lessons. Coursera Honor Code Learn more I, Peter Burgess, understand that submitting work that isn’t my own may result in permanent failure of this course or deactivation of my Coursera account. Skip to Main Content Coursera SEARCH IN COURSE Search in course Peter Burgess Impact Measurement & Management for the SDGs Week 1 Week 1 Practice Quiz Welcome and Introduction to the Course About SDG Impact Standards Reading: What are the SDG Impact Standards? . Duration: 5 minutes5 min Reading: Aligning with Impact Standards: Which Ones? . Duration: 5 minutes5 min Optional Resources Reading: Additional resources - IMM for the SDGs . Duration: 1 minute1 min Review Practice Quiz: Week 1 Practice Quiz 8 questions Purchase a subscription to unlock this item. Quiz: Week 1 Graded Quiz 7 questions Discussion Prompt: Feedback on Week 1 Week 1 Practice Quiz Practice Quiz10 minutes • 10 min Submit your assignment Receive grade To Pass 80% or higher Your grade 100% We keep your highest score Week 1 Practice Quiz Practice Quiz • 10 min Congratulations! You passed! Grade received 100% To pass 80% or higher Week 1 Practice Quiz Total points 10 1. Question 1 What are the SDGs? 2 / 2 points
  • A global “to-do list” for achieving sustainable development.
  • Disclosure and reporting standards for sustainability
  • Goals for development created by the US government.
Correct Correct. The 17 sustainable development goals are an urgent call for action by all countries - developed and developing - in a global partnership. They recognize that ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests. 2. Question 2 What is impact measurement and management? 2 / 2 points
  • A set of practices that help your organization make better and more informed decisions about how to measure performance and continually improve the well-being of people and planet you influence.
  • A set of metrics that tell you how much impact you have had on your financial stakeholders.
  • The practice of pulling data on SDGs into a report you can share with stakeholders
Correct Correct. The focus of this course is on this set of practices. 3. Question 3 Which of these statements is the best definition of sustainable development as envisioned by the UN SDGs? 1 / 1 point
  • Sustainable development is development that aims to maximize financial value to improve the financial well-being for as many people as possible, globally.
  • Sustainable development is development that aims to create a more sustainable, equitable, and peaceful world, where the present population’s needs can be met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.
Correct Correct. 4. Question 4 Why is the private sector important for achieving the SDGs? 1 / 1 point
  • Because EVERY business and EVERY investor has impact on people’s lives and the planet – both positive and negative, intended and unintended impacts.
  • Because the public sector thinks that the private sector should be primarily responsible for fixing the planet’s problems
Correct Correct. Review the Welcome to IMM for SDGs video to learn more. 5. Question 5 Which of the following statements is NOT a valid reason why businesses should want to manage their impact on SDGs? 1 / 1 point
  • To make better and more informed decisions about how to improve the well-being of people and planet they influence.
  • To show they are being good corporate citizens with the assets and influence they wield on communities
  • To sell fewer products
To get a better cost of capital Correct Correct - this is not a valid reason. There is no reason to think that a business will sell fewer products by managing their impact on SDGs. 6. Question 6 Who wrote and produced this course? 1 / 1 point
  • The team at CASE at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, led by Faculty Director Cathy Clark, with help from SDG Impact, the Impact Management Project, and many global advisors.
  • The SDG Impact team at the UNDP
Correct Correct. If you want to learn more about CASE, visit www.caseatduke.org. We are an award-winning research and educational center on social impact, impact investing and business for good. We are grateful to our Impact Measurement and Management Academic Working Group, which includes the members listed below. The team at SDG Impact at the UNDP commissioned and sponsored the course and has provided expert advice to us along the way. For more information on SDG impact, see: https://sdgimpact.undp.org/ 7. Question 7 What are the 4 universal practices of impact measurement and management around which this course is organized? 1 / 1 point
  • Set Strategy, Collect Data, Disclose, Get Certified
  • Environment, Social, and Governance, and Impact
  • Set Strategy, Integrate, Optimize, Reinforce
Correct Correct. Review the 4 Steps for Impact Management video to learn more. 8. Question 8 When you view this course, you should: 1 / 1 point
  • Only do the lessons that apply to your role, enterprise or investor.
  • No matter what your role, for each week or step, start with the enterprise lessons and then, complete the investor lessons.
Correct Correct. In each module, start with the enterprise lesson to understand the goals, constraints, and operational guidance enterprises face. Then, if you are an investor or want to learn all the content, view the investor lesson to understand the unique characteristics of working higher on the capital chain for sustainable development. The content in each investor lesson assumes learners have completed the prior enterprise and investor lessons. Feedback on Week 1 Take a moment to give us some feedback on what you learned this week. What is the most significant thing you learned this week? What question is at the top of mind at the end of this week's lesson? Participation is optional More than anything else, I probably learned that I am more out-of-touch now than I was several decades ago. While I like to think that my work with management metrics has progressed over the years, it seems that the gap between what I want to see and how others see management metrics is growing over time. In the 1960s and 1970s many of the senior people in the UN, the World Bank and major national international development agencies had a lot of field experience. Relative to that time, and now most of the senior people seem to have academic and institutional experience without years or decades of field experience. I was modestly critical of the MDGs prior to 2000, and much more critical of the SDGs in the run-up to 2015. As a management initiative the SDGs are incredibly weak and incoherent. It bothers me that as the SDGs have been popularized, the MDGs have almost totally dropped out of view. This is convenient because the metrics of progress and performance would have highlighted the long term degradation of development results. While some of the progress of international development has been positive and impressive, far too much has been awful ... and meaningful management metrics simply don't appear to exist. Maybe I am simply out of touch and not in the loop ... but my guess is that many good policy options have been downgraded in favor of policies that benefit the corrupt and powerful and accountability much lower today than fifty years ago! Week 2 Estimated Time: 3h Week 3 Estimated Time: 2h 16m Week 4 Estimated Time: 1h 25m Week 5 Estimated Time: 1h 16m Do you want to receive emails

The text being discussed is available at

and
SITE COUNT<
Amazing and shiny stats
Blog Counters Reset to zero January 20, 2015
TrueValueMetrics (TVM) is an Open Source / Open Knowledge initiative. It has been funded by family and friends. TVM is a 'big idea' that has the potential to be a game changer. The goal is for it to remain an open access initiative.
WE WANT TO MAINTAIN AN OPEN KNOWLEDGE MODEL
A MODEST DONATION WILL HELP MAKE THAT HAPPEN
The information on this website may only be used for socio-enviro-economic performance analysis, education and limited low profit purposes
Copyright © 2005-2021 Peter Burgess. All rights reserved.