image missingTrue Value Metrics (TVM)
Meaningful Metrics for a Smart Society
image missing Navigation ... HOME
HOME BRIEF PROBLEMS
POSSIBILITIES
SYSTEM
OVERVIEW
PROGRESS
PERFORMANCE
STATE
CAPITALS
FLOW
ACTIVITIES
FLOW
ACTORS
EFFECTIVE
MANAGEMENT
PETER
BURGESS
SiteNav SitNav (1) SitNav (2) SitNav (3) SitNav (4) SitNav (5) SitNav (6) SitNav (7) SitNav (8)
Date: 2019-09-18 Page is: DBtxt001.php txt00000509

Health
The GlobalHealthCheck dialog

Announcement of a new Oxfam initiative to have dialog about global health

To Peter Burgess peterbnyc@gmail.com
[afro-nets] Oxfam, Global Health Check - a new online debating space
From Anna Marriott AMarriott@oxfam.org.uk Fri, Sep 2, 2011 at 10:44 AM
Reply-To: 'African Networks for Health Research and Development (AFRO-NETS)'
To: phm-exchange

Please join Global Health Check, a new online space designed to provoke debate and conversation on health financing and service delivery. Global Health Check is edited by Anna Marriott, Health Policy Advisor for Oxfam GB, and in the coming weeks the site will feature contributions from a variety of authors.

This first post for Global Health Check reviews recent evidence on the impact of removing user fees for mothers and children in Sierra Leone one year after the policy was first introduced. To read the post online visit Global Health Check: http://www.globalhealthcheck.org/

To subscribe to Global Health Check please visit: http://www.globalhealthcheck.org/?page_id=199

Here is the first post, on our exciting new platform:

*One year on: the impact of removing health care user fees in Sierra Leone

While there are still some commentators who seem stuck on the question of whether removing fees for health care in poor countries is a good idea at all - thankfully there are others who have moved on to the much more critical question of not whether this should happen - but how.

The recent World Health Report on Health Financing for Universal Coverage leaves no doubt that user fees are a bad idea. In the Director General’s own words, they constitute 'by far the greatest obstacle to progress' on the path to universal access.

Learning how to successfully remove fees is best done by looking at those countries that have made that bold step forward. The introduction of free care for pregnant women and children in 2010 in Sierra Leone – a post-conflict nation with a crumbling and severely under-resourced health system and one of the highest rates of maternal deaths in the world - provides very relevant lessons for the numerous other low-income countries facing similar challenges.

READ THE REST OF THIS POSTING ONLINE; ADDRESS ABOVE.

Anna Marriott
Health Policy Advisor
Development Finance and Public Services Team Oxfam GB
mailto:AMarriott@oxfam.org.uk
_______________________________________________
AFRO-NETS, an e-forum on health research and development in Africa, is moderated by an expert, and hosted by the FHI360-SATELLIFE Center for Health Information and Technology (www.healthnet.org)


This is response by Peter Burgess to this message:


Dear Colleagues

I am glad to see this initiative. A good dialog about important matters is a step in the right direction ... but what are important matters? I argue that the purpose of any economic activity, including academic study and dialog is to improve quality of life, but my impression of the modern world is that most resources are actually allocated to profit and self-serving wealth creation, and the society at large 'be damned'. I refer to this as the 'capitalist market economy' which has no ability to do anything except what is profitable, when what we need is a 'value market economy' where resources get allocated to economic activities that do the most to add value, satisfy critical needs and improve quality of life.

In the case of the health sector, there has been wonderful progress in the science, but the sector is in disarray when it comes to the application of the science in an affordable cost effective way to those that need health services. There are dysfunctionalities at both the rich end of the sector (USA for example) and at the economic 'base of the pyramid' (BOP). I have been critical for years about the management information used within the health dialog and specifically the lack of cost accounting information on one side and the lack of specific health impact on the other.

Observing socio-economic development over a period of several decades I have concluded that performance is a function of place as well as the specifics of the intervention. I am on record that there could be a tenfold improvement in performance if interventions were optimized to suit the location ... and of course there need to be place specific data to keep track of this.

I will follow the Global Health Check ... it might be interesting

Peter Burgess
@truevaluemetric
www.truevaluemetrics.org


Anna Marriott
September 15, 2011
The text being discussed is available at

SITE COUNT
Amazing and shiny stats
Blog Counters Reset to zero January 20, 2015
TrueValueMetrics (TVM) is an Open Source / Open Knowledge initiative. It has been funded by family and friends plus donations from well wishers who understand the importance of accountability and getting the management metrics right. TVM is a 'big idea' that has the potential to be a game changer leveling the playing field so the wealth and power is shared on a more reasonable basis between people who work for a living and those that own the economy and the levers of power. In order to be effective, it cannot be funded in the conventional way with a for profit business plan, but absolutely must remain an open access initiative.
WE WANT TO MAINTAIN AN OPEN KNOWLEDGE MODEL
A MODEST DONATION WILL HELP MAKE THAT HAPPEN


The information on this website may only be used for socio-enviro-economic performance analysis, personal information, education and limited low profit purposes
Copyright © 2005-2019 Peter Burgess. All rights reserved.